Photography Exhibition | Dennis Gilbert & Jon May

PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION DATES
16 JULY – 11 SEPTEMBER 2004

Photofusion is pleased to present an exhibition of two British-based photographers, Dennis Gilbert and Jon May, who have a shared interest in architecture. Gilbert has been working as an architectural photographer for the past two decades, travelling extensively to create a picture of a diverse architectural landscape. In contrast, May concentrates on producing a narrative in his work through a subjective relationship with his surroundings. This will be May’s first solo exhibition.

South African-born Dennis Gilbert is an architectural photographer based in London who has worked in Europe, Asia, USA and South Africa, creating an archive of 20 years’ work. Selected by the photographer from his archive, Modern Equations explores the relationship between architecture and photography and the connections formed between images. Placing two or three photographs together within a frame, Gilbert creates a visual line of enquiry by shifting the focus from viewing an image on its own, to looking at it in terms of its relationship to another.

Although his work largely consists of commissions by architects, arts organisations and publishers, Gilbert views his personal practice as a part of the whole: a distillation of all the narrative, documentary, descriptive, abstract or more personal elements that make up his approach to photographing architecture

Jon May first became interested in photography whilst working for British Aerospace as an aircraft fitter. Influenced by his industrial surroundings, May studied photography at the University of Brighton where his work took on an architectural theme.

This is May’s first major body of work which he began making in 2001. These photographs of industrial units where he’s worked have a faceless anonymity, there is no human presence and the windows reflect the world outside rather than reveal what lies behind them. Industrial units are born out of functionality and are easily replaceable structures. However, they are also a recognised feature of British industry. May’s black and white photographs have a timeless and hypnotic beauty, bringing a quiet dignity to this often overlooked architectural landscape.

This series of photographs reflects an emotional journey – the journey becoming a personal dedication to his father.

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